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Michael Kirke

Michael Kirke was born in Ireland. In 1966 he graduated from University College Dublin (History and Politics). In that year he began working on the sub-editorial desk of The Evening Press in Dublin and in 1968 went to the newsroom of the Irish Press group of newspapers, contributing news and features to the group’s three titles – morning, evening and Sunday papers. In 1969 he went to Belfast and covered the initial unravelling of the Unionist hegemony in the province. Later that year he became the group’s education specialist. In 1973 took leave of absence to pursue postgraduate studies in education in Trinity College Dublin, where he graduated in 1976.

In 1978 he left journalism and moved into teaching. In 1981 he was appointed headmaster of Rockbrook Park School in Dublin (www.rockbrook.ie).

In 1994 made another career shift, left teaching and moved to Galway in the West of Ireland where he began working part-time in media again. He is now back in Dublin, working in media and as a freelance writer. His main interests are in cultural, political, and educational affairs, probably in that order.


Marry and submit to him. What?
28 Mar 2014 | FEATURES |
tags: Christian theology, feminism, marriage
An Italian journalist gives advice that has feminists fuming. Is she mad?


Stumbling forward into the past
25 Mar 2014 | FEATURES |
tags: Christianity, culture, Roman Empire, Western civilization
Even the Roman Empire had a use-by date. What is ours?


Why Christian ideals are the foundation of a secular society
4 Mar 2014 | FEATURES |
tags: Christianity, history, secularism
Secularism is Europe’s noblest achievement and Christianity’s gift to the world, says an Oxford don.


Through the underworld to transcendence
7 Feb 2014 | FEATURES |
tags: book reviews, fiction
Donna Tartt's splendid third novel The Goldfinch is a sharp critique of corrupt Western culture.


Manifesto for a new Ireland: start with conscience rights
16 Jul 2013 | FEATURES |
tags: abortion, conscientious objection, Ireland
Defying her party's attempt to force consciences on the abortion issue, Lucinda Creighton loses her job but saves a fundamental right.


What is really going on?
12 Feb 2013 | CONJUGALITY |
tags: David Cameron, European Court of Human Rights, Lynne Fetherstone, Teresa May
On March 27 last year, the UK’s representation in Strasbourg organised the European Council’s first “closed conference” (ie, public not admitted), to agree detailed plans for the June 2013 implementation of "equal civil marriage”, with a keynote address from Lynne Featherstone. A speech by the British judge, Sir Nicolas Bratza, then head of the European Court of Human Rights, signalled that the court was ready to declare same-sex marriage a “human right”, as soon as enough countries fell into line.


Mother of Parliaments divorces an institution it has been wedded to for almost one thousand years
6 Feb 2013 | CONJUGALITY |
tags: David Cameron, House of Commons, United Kingdom
Yesterday, Tuesday, February 5, 2013, was D-Day for marriage in the United Kingdom – well, in the England and Wales segment of it anyway. Yesterday evening (British time) Marriage was redefined in a fairly massive vote in Britain’s House of Commons after six hours of debate. The vote was 400-175. More than 70 members spoke.


Last ditch attempt to protect freedom of speech and conscience?
29 Jan 2013 | CONJUGALITY |
tags: British Government, Freedom of conscience, Freedom of speech
A British MP is going to table a bill in the House of Commons this week which seeks to protect “conscientious beliefs about the definition of marriage”. The bill, being introduced by Edward Leigh, will seek to amend equality legislation to protect free speech. Among other things, it addresses the perceived threat to teachers and public workers who might find the Government’s attempt to legislate for a redefinition of marriage.


Stormy weather on the horizon?
24 Jan 2013 | CONJUGALITY |
tags: David Cameron, Freedom of conscience, Illiinois, United Kingdom
The pending bill would, for the first time in our state's history, redefine marriage to legally recognize same-sex "marriages." But neither two men nor two women - nor, for that matter, three or more people - can possibly form a marriage. Our law would be lying if it said they could.


Google in the dock?
23 Jan 2013 | CONJUGALITY |
tags: google, Iona Institute, Ireland, YouTube
What is going on? Now you see it, now you don’t, now you see it again. Google has been involved in some sinister censorship – or perhaps they just blundered and then caught themselves on. We know that Google supports the campaign for gay “marriage” in the US – and presumably further afield as well – but we did not suspect that they would be censoring opposing viewpoints on the issue. Are they?


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