Age


World’s Oldest Man Turns 116

Shannon Roberts | 29 April 2013

Ten days ago on the 19th of April, the world’s oldest person celebrated his 116th birthday in Kyoto, Japan, becoming the oldest person ever (well at least that we know of!).  He was born all the way back in 1897.  Will we rush to study his diet, exercise regime and skincare products?


Fetal health not only a female affair

Shannon Roberts | 29 January 2013

While most people are used to considering the female ticking body clock, we tend to think that men have a lot more time.  Though true is one sense, if we want healthy babies maybe they too should be considering the age factor.  An interesting article in the New Republic highlights this issue among many others associated with the rising age of parents – it’s well worth a read.

 
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