Fertility


Fertility decreases for third year in a row in Canada

Shannon Roberts | 11 July 2013

New figures from Statistics Canada show that fertility there has decreased for the third year in a row.  It hasn’t been above the replacement level of 2.1 children since 1971, and was just 1.61 children per women in 2011.


“Astonishing” demographic change in Latin America

Shannon Roberts | 25 June 2013

New published demographic research by Albert Esteve at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, reveals Latin American society is changing at an unprecedented rate.  For generations people have been focussed on early marriage, family and child-rearing, but now co-habitation rather than marriage is becoming a norm and having children is being postponed.  It took “rich” countries 50 years, with changes occurring in sequence, while in Latin America the changes have happened in half the time and all at once, resulting in faster, less predictable social change.

 


Fetal health not only a female affair

Shannon Roberts | 29 January 2013

While most people are used to considering the female ticking body clock, we tend to think that men have a lot more time.  Though true is one sense, if we want healthy babies maybe they too should be considering the age factor.  An interesting article in the New Republic highlights this issue among many others associated with the rising age of parents – it’s well worth a read.


United Nations addresses falling Asian fertility and sex imbalance

Shannon Roberts | 10 September 2012

Even the United Nations, with its dire statistics about the number of babies overpopulating the earth, is now becoming worried about falling fertility rates and gender imbalance in Asia.  The head of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) called for countries to urgently tackle population concerns with “foresight and justice” at the Asian Population Association conference held late last month. The question will be just what the well recognised virtue, ‘justice’, means in practice.


A growing socioeconomic divide between parents

Shannon Buckley | 23 June 2012

A New York Times blogger raises interesting questions this week about the effect on us all of the growing socioeconomic divide between parents.  That is, more and more educated, well off woman will just be becoming mothers as their less well off, less educated peers are becoming grandmothers.


A rise in ‘fertility tourism’

Shannon Buckley | 14 June 2012

More and more women desperate to have babies in New Zealand are going overseas to find egg donors because they cannot get them in New Zealand. It seems that the main reason overseas ‘egg markets’ are more lucrative is because women are allowed to be paid for their eggs.


More Educated Women opting to have Families

Shannon Buckley | 05 May 2012

For the first time a recent study has found that a greater number of highly educated women in their late 30’s and 40’s in the United States are deciding to have children, something that Newswise describes as ‘a dramatic turnaround from recent history’ in an interesting article based on a new study by Ohio University (reported here in the Journal of Population Economics).  In fact, fertility increased at almost all ages since the late 1990s or 2000 across all groups of women studied.


Grow for it!

Shannon Buckley | 12 March 2012

2 Million Russians turn out for fertility relic

Shannon Buckley | 25 November 2011
Normally situated at the Vatopedi Monastery on Mount Athos in Greece, the relic made of camel wool is believed to have the power to boost fertility. The National Post reports yesterday that the Russian people really have come out in force! Braving cold and snow, Moscow residents were willing to stand in a 5km line just to touch the belt...

Russia and the Belt of the Mother of God

Marcus Roberts | 21 October 2011
A venerated Orthodox relic is starting a month-long tour of Russia to boost fertility.

Recession and Childbearing in the US

Marcus Roberts | 17 August 2011
Demographers argue that the recession will lead to lower fertility in the US.

Healthier women have twins

Shannon Buckley | 11 June 2011
New Research shows that healthier women are more likely to have twins naturally. But what does this mean for increasing numbers of unnatural births?
 
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