January
10th
  7:12:15 PM

The real reason for Putin’s US adoption ban?

orphans

Russian President Vladimir Putin upset a lot of Americans with his December 28 (feast of the Holy Innocents) ban on adoptions to the US -- at the same time ordering his government to take a range of steps to make it easier for Russians to adopt orphans.  The law took effect effect Jan. 1, leaving in legal limbo about 50 children who were in the final phases of adoption.

Why? Putin and officials have cited the deaths of 19 Russian children adopted in the United States in the past 13 years (that's out of about 45,000), but it is also widely seen as retaliation at another level. The Wall Street Journal says:

The adoption ban was included in a package of measures the Kremlin pushed through parliament to retaliate for a new U.S. law aimed at punishing alleged Russian human-rights violators. That law was named for Sergei Magnitsky, a lawyer who died in prison after exposing what he said was a $230 million fraud perpetrated by senior Russian police officials. Russian officials insist his death was an accident.

But there's yet another possibility: demography. Comments Paul Kengor on Catholic Exchange:

The reality is that Russia continues to hemorrhage population. Russia’s population is projected to plummet from 140 million to 104 million by 2050. And what are the chief causal factors? There are several, but the two biggest are abortion and contraception—which occur at astonishingly high levels. Putin has tried to reverse both.

Abortion has wreaked havoc on Russia since the Bolsheviks legalized it a century ago. Soviet communists were way ahead of American liberals. By the 1970s, when abortion was legalized in America, the Soviet Union was already witnessing a staggering 7.2 million abortions per year.

The Cold War ended in the 1990s, but Russia’s runaway rates of abortion—as well as contraception—did not.

In response, Vladimir Putin has implemented the first restrictions on abortion in Russia in almost 50 years, limiting abortions to within 12 weeks. He even initiated a National Fertility Day.

Unfortunately, none of this has really worked.

Of course, the best place for children to be is with their own parents, or with adoptive parents in their own country and culture -- all other things being equal. But all other things are not; there are not many adoptive parents available in Russia. There were an estimated 700,000 orphans in 2010, and orphanages are often overcrowded.

One thing is certain: children should not be made pawns in any political or even demographic game.

 



to make a comment, click here

This article is published by Carolyn Moynihan and MercatorNet.com under a Creative Commons licence. You may republish it or translate it free of charge with attribution for non-commercial purposes following these guidelines. If you teach at a university we ask that your department make a donation. Commercial media must contact us for permission and fees. Some articles on this site are published under different terms.


 
about this blog | Bookmark and Share

Search this blog

 Subscribe to Demography is Destiny
rss RSS feed of posts

 Recent Posts
Iran leads Muslim countries in fertility decline
20 Apr 2014
Russia: Growing and More Assertive
14 Apr 2014
Japan’s Shrinking Role in the World
8 Apr 2014
Why you shouldn’t take alarmist population predictions seriously
6 Apr 2014
Is Single Occupancy Vandalising the Environment?
4 Apr 2014

 MercatorNet blogs
Style and culture: Tiger Print
Family social policy: Family Edge
US political scene: Sheila Liaugminas
News about bioethics: BioEdge
From the editors: Conniptions

 Archive
Apr 2014 | Mar 2014 | Feb 2014 | Jan 2014 | more >>

 From MercatorNet's home page

Is “conscious uncoupling” really such a loopy idea?
15 Apr 2014
Gwyneth Paltrow was ridiculed when she explained her divorce, but there's a nugget of truth in her words.

A deal with the devil
11 Apr 2014
Why did American officials refuse to prosecute Japanese doctors who had committed horrendous crimes in World War II?

“Is this the upshot of your experiment?”
10 Apr 2014
A Nathaniel Hawthorne tale of scientific obsession sheds light on today's designer children.

Protecting the first “little platoon”
10 Apr 2014
Society needs family values - but not the faith they are based on? Where a liberal proposal falls down.

US defence policy in the wake of the Ukrainian affair
10 Apr 2014
Rethinking American strategy in the framework of conventional war against enemies fighting on their own terrain.


 Tags
Burma, fertitily, foetus, Sweden, Migration, Vietnam, sex selective abortion, research, children, Border security, University College London, population decline, UN, Bangladesh, risk, population, Replacement Rate, Census, antibiotics, values, population density, Falkland Islands, Medicaid, Diabetes, Mo Yan, Scotland, Sir Andrew Green, Crimea, Anglican Church, Belfast, West Virginia, New Zealand, family structure, Italy, Iran, overpopulation myth, Pope Francis, resources, Korea, Chinese New Year, United States, The Economist, France, Malthus, environment, consumers, Carbon Credits, centenarians, Medicine, demographics, Royal Family, New Zealand, Rugby, Ageing, sex selection, demographic growth, modernity, pollution, Europe, Lancet, shortages, fertility, World Bank, Immigration, sex, satire, happiness, Christmas, humanism, volunteering, Muslim, one child policy, internal migration, Japan earthquake, subsidy, minorities, rural depopulation, ageing population, family policy, Population Matters, population projections, utilitarianism, contraceptives, Overpopulation, anti-humanism, demographic decline, The Onion, military, Nature magazine, Orthodox Church, Pakistan, Population Centre, Japan tsunami, youth bulge, Ban Ki-moon, Inheritance, superbugs, birthrate, security, saving, Belgium,
Follow MercatorNet
Facebook
Twitter
Newsletters
Sections and Blogs
Harambee
PopCorn
Conjugality
Careful!
Family Edge
Sheila Reports
Reading Matters
Demography Is Destiny
Bioedge
Conniptions (the editorial)
Connecting
Information
our ideals
our People
Mercator who?
partner sites
audited accounts
donate
New Media Foundation
Suite 212
75 Archer Street
Chatswood NSW 2067
Australia

editor@mercatornet.com
+61 2 9007 1187

© New Media Foundation 2014 | powered by Encyclomedia | designed by Elleston