WEDNESDAY, 15 OCTOBER 2008

Who scored the most points in the debate?

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Joe the plumber.

 

During tonight’s debate the candidates mentioned Joe by name more than a dozen times throughout the course of the 90-minute debate.

Actually, one count had it at 15 mentions. And it seemed like more. Over and over, Joe became the Average American who both candidates addressed. 

Sen. McCain: “Joe, I want to tell you, I’ll not only help you buy that business that you worked your whole life for and be able - and I’ll keep your taxes low and I’ll provide available and affordable health care for you and your employees.”

Sen. Obama: “Now, the conversation I had with Joe the plumber, what I essentially said to him was, ‘Five years ago, when you were in a position to buy your business, you needed a tax cut then, and what I want to do is to make sure that the plumber, the… click here to read whole article and make comments


 

TUESDAY, 14 OCTOBER 2008

Could this issue determine the election?

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It’s the one that no one has asked the presidential candidates about in the debates.

But soon after Gov. Sarah Palin came on the Republican ticket, former New York Mayor Ed Koch wrote this piece saying that abortion is driving this election.

I have read in the press that there is one large group of women and men who are enthralled by Palin’s support of the right-to-life movement demonstrated by her qualified support of the Republican platform on the issue of abortion which reads, “…..we assert the inherent dignity and sanctity of all human life and affirm that the unborn child has a fundamental individual right to life which cannot be infringed. We support a human life amendment to the Constitution, and we endorse legislation to make clear that the Fourteenth Amendment’s protections apply to unborn children. We oppose using public revenues to promote or perform abortion and will not fund organizations which advocate it. We… click here to read whole article and make comments


 

MONDAY, 13 OCTOBER 2008

Palin’s Pennsylvania speech

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She focused again on abortion. Mainstream media reported it with choice words.

Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin charged into the culture wars Saturday in Pennsylvania, painting Sen. Barack Obama as a radical on abortion rights…

Ethics woes aside, Palin focused her attention on abortion — an issue that rallies the conservative base but some say alienates independent and women voters.

“In times like these with wars and financial crisis, I know that it may be easy to forget even as deep and abiding a concern as the right to life, and it seems that our opponent kind of hopes you will forget that,” Palin told a crowd in Johnstown. “He hopes that you won’t notice how radical, absolutely radical his idea is on this, and his record is, until it’s too late.”

However…

Palin said Obama’s record on the matter is too extreme to be… click here to read whole article and make comments


 

MONDAY, 13 OCTOBER 2008

How well do we know this man?

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America may be about to elect him president, but Barack Obama’s ascendancy left out the traditional rigors of climbing the political ranks and taking the usual brunt of scrutiny.

Now, we’re a few weeks away. And now, people are asking questions.

Speaking to a group of young Catholics in New York almost one month before Election Day, I had a harsh awakening as jarring as a shot of Wild Turkey 101. Weeks before going to the polling booth, Americans do not know Barack Obama.

In a packed bar, I was discussing the contentious question of whether a Catholic can support Obama for president. I highlighted the priority that defending innocent human lives takes in these considerations, according to the Church. I then went through Obama’s radical record on abortion. The jolt came after I finished speaking, when one by one, people told me they had no idea Obama was so… click here to read whole article and make comments


 

SUNDAY, 12 OCTOBER 2008

Ask the candidates about judges

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This is worth repeating. The single most important issue to vote is the president’s power to appoint judges.

So, what are we hearing in the debates about that?

Mario Diaz, the policy director for legal issues for the pro-life group Concerned Women for America, says he is surprised a comment Biden made during the vice-presidential debate hasn’t received more attention.

Asked to name a policy issue on which he changed his mind, Biden said he determined five years into his Senate tenure that he should start evaluating the ideology of judicial appointments.

“It took about five years for me to realize that the ideology of that judge makes a big difference,” he said.

Biden went on to say that judicial picks are important because of their views on Roe v. Wade, the landmark Supreme Court case that allowed virtually unlimited abortions for any reason during pregnancy,… click here to read whole article and make comments


 

SUNDAY, 12 OCTOBER 2008

No debating this

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More and more people are asking why the presidential debates are not asking the right questions. Or at least certain categories of them, which seem to be off limits.

Like issues that are important to moral conservatives.

The questions he chose, and they were all of [moderator Tom Brokaw’s] choosing, predictably precluded the social, cultural, and moral issues—abortion, same-sex marriage, the judicial usurpation of politics—that have real traction with McCain’s base. Not that McCain seems to understand his base, or else he could easily have moved the discussion in those directions.

That’s another question people are asking…..since candidates typically use any question whatsoever to launch into whatever issues and talking points they want to make. Why isn’t McCain raising these social, cultural and moral issues himself somehow?

All the particulars implied in the familiar, and true, assertion that Obama is an extreme liberal are legitimate, and urgent, subjects… click here to read whole article and make comments


 

FRIDAY, 10 OCTOBER 2008

America is looking for a statesman

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While we endure the presidential campaign frenzy, the voices of constant and reliable moral government leaders rise to the top.

Here’s one of them. Saturday on ‘America’s Lifeline’, Sen. Daniel Webster is the featured guest, and he is inspiring.

Three times he has earned the recognition as ‘Statesman of the Year’ in the Florida Senate. Talk about reforming government and encouraging bi-partisanship….Sen. Webster has long had a reputation for both.

Summarized in a Florida House resolution adopted unanimously April 28 naming the body’s largest committee room, “Speaker Daniel Webster Hall,” Webster “radically reformed” the Florida House “permanently changing the culture of the Florida Legislature,” according to House Resolution 9183.

The first Republican Speaker in 122 years emphasized the importance of family by requiring all House business be concluded no later than 6 p.m. He empowered members of the minority party by allowing their bills to be considered on… click here to read whole article and make comments


 

THURSDAY, 9 OCTOBER 2008

Be prepared for more of the same next time

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It will be a pleasant surprise if the next - and last - presidential debate tackles the tough questions on moral issues and judicial philosophy, among other areas left unaddressed lately in the other debates.

But don’t count on it. There’s a template for these things, and network anchors pretty much stick to it.

The candidates were queried on a narrow range of foreign, economic, health care, and environmental issues–the stuff they talk about every day at rallies and fundraisers. These didn’t come close to what voters at a real town hall meeting might have asked. There was no mention of abortion, immigration, moral values, same sex marriage, guns, their role models, their view of the presidency, or their religious faith.

Like Barnes suggests, let’s have Rick Warren back.

click here to read whole article and make comments

 

WEDNESDAY, 8 OCTOBER 2008

A few things about the debate

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Photo by Stephen Crowley/The New York Times

One interesting snapshot of the fundamental difference in the way the two presidential candidates approach issues came at the point of the debate when they had already been discussing health care, and moderator Tom Brokaw asked them a swift and pointed question.

Brokaw: Quick discussion. Is health care in America a privilege, a right, or a responsibility?

Sen. McCain?

McCain: I think it’s a responsibility, in this respect, in that we should have available and affordable health care to every American citizen, to every family member. And with the plan that — that I have, that will do that.

But government mandates I — I’m always a little nervous about. But it is certainly my responsibility. It is certainly small-business people and others, and they… click here to read whole article and make comments


 

TUESDAY, 7 OCTOBER 2008

“Perfect but nor normal”

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That’s an inspired description by Gov. Sarah Palin of her son, Trig, a child with Down Syndrome.

The prominence of this family and their embrace of a ’special needs’ child has been a gift to the families and children who have struggled with the stigma some cultural liberals have attached to any class of citizens they deem defective. Trig’s presence has already changed things.

Planned Parenthood has garnered over $800,000 with a cheap shot fundraising email encouraging donations in Sarah Palin’s name, but the Alaska Governor has dished out some grand comeuppance by inspiring the passage of H.R. 3112, a bill that requires physicians to inform pregnant mothers of all available options when receiving the news that they are carrying a special needs child.

The bill was a response to the high abortion rates of special needs children, and was delivered to the President’s desk yesterday.

In the… click here to read whole article and make comments


 

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Sheila Reports promises a perspective here that you may not be getting in mainstream media and the politically charged blogosphere. Don’t expect political correctness, because politics doesn’t determine what’s correct. This space is grounded in the natural law and moral order. And it expects civility, goodwill and an openness to truth and reason.


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