mercatornet

Book Reviews

C.S. Lewis in the trenches of WWI

C.S. Lewis in the trenches of WWI

by Jon Dykstra | April 06, 2017

EMAIL

“Second Lieutenant C.S. Lewis in the trenches of WWI” – if that doesn’t grab you, I don’t know what will. War in the Wasteland is a novel about teenage Lewis’s time on the front lines of the First World War. At this point in his life, at just 19, Lewis is an atheist, and his hellish surroundings seem to confirm for him that there is no God.

When men are hunkered down in their trenches waiting through another enemy artillery barrage, there is a motivation to talk about life’s most important matters. Lewis’s fellow junior officer is a good debater, and won’t let Lewis’s atheistic thinking go unchallenged. Their dialogue is imagined – this is a fictionalized account – but the author pulls the points and counterpoints of their back and forth argument straight out of the books Lewis wrote after he turned from atheism and became one of the best known Christian apologists on the planet.

War in the Wasteland comes to a solid and satisfying conclusion, which is a neat trick, consider that Lewis’s story of conversion is, at this point, very much incomplete. This would be great for older teens and adults who have an interest in history, World War I, apologetics, or C.S. Lewis. Bond has crafted something remarkable here.

Jon Dykstra blogs on books at ReallyGoodReads.com.

EMAIL

comments powered by Disqus