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Star pitcher quits baseball

Star pitcher quits baseball

by Jennifer Minicus | November 30, 2016

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Life hasn't been the same for eleven-year-old Quinnen since the death of her older sister, Haley, a year ago. Haley had always been Quinnen's number one fan when she pitched for her little league team. Since Haley's tragic death, Quinnen no longer has had the heart to play the sport she loves so much.

Quinnen's parents decide that the best medicine for their grieving daughter is to host one of the local minor league players for the summer. Quinnen resists the friendship of the team at first, but baseball still has a hold on her. With the support of one favorite player, Quinnen finds the courage to face the reason her sister's death has been so hard to accept and to help her parents confront their loss as well.

Using chapters alternating between past and present, Jenn Bishop gradually reveals to readers the complex relationship that Quinnen shared with Haley. Quinnen is a typical younger sister who idolizes her older sibling but experiences bouts of jealousy as Haley begins to date. This is, in part, due to Haley’s evasive and at times suggestive answers to questions about her boyfriend.

Quinnen displays a good measure of common sense in spite of her young age. She is the only member of the family who seems willing to talk about her sister and her tragic death. She is also the only person who seems to understand that she is still a child. Quinnen's mother "pushes" her daughter towards maturity. She tries to convince Quinnen to wear tight jeans and signs her up for a book club that will read books focusing on puberty. Quinnen rightfully balks. While the premise of this story is promising, certain details disqualify it for its intended audience.

A former teacher, Jennifer Minicus is currently a full-time wife and mother.

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